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Nobody’s Home

On a very early and chilly April morning, I drove past this farmhouse while driving to ‘Helmcken Falls’ in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. Large, old, and historical, I was curious. Signifying the Canadian dream for so many, I wondered how could something so grand could end up empty and ignored. As the house sat decrepit and abandoned, choosing an image title was simple, ‘Nobody’s Home’.  

Located midway between the northern Rockies of Alberta and the City of Vancouver, this location seems like it would have been the perfect wilderness outpost. The house on the left and the stable to the right were perfectly positioned, almost neatly framed, by the two converging mountains in the background. The mountains, rich with British Columbia’s dense green forest starkly contrasts the dry dead trees bunched up on the left side of the house.  

In this shot, I especially love the spotty, melting snow in the foreground and the how it added some welcomed texture to the image, while simultaneously signaling the onset of spring. The highest point of the roof, perhaps being just that much closer to the sun lacked any snow, and further suggested a shift in the seasons. The sky, although looking somewhat ominous in the background, offered a beautiful contrast to the smattering of white in the foreground.

Although, I struggle to guess its era, I like to envision the family who lived here. Without venturing inside, I imagine a different way of life. A time where everything was used and nearly nothing was wasted. Though easily overlooked and forgotten, this house marks not only a special point in history, but also significant architectural interest too.

“Nobody’s Home” left me with so many questions. Who lived here? For how long? Why did they leave and where did they go? This home, while marking history, also reminds me that home, for most of us, is where the heart is.